Friday, 5 June 2015

New Dawn Fades @ The Dance House, 22.05.15

Being a Scouser in Manchester I have on occasion come into contact with the Liverpool v Manchester ideology. It is a rivalry that has been fought for years, and I’m not entirely sure of how it started. Now and again I’m asked “what’s a Scouser doing in Manchester?” followed by the predictable and over phlegmy impressions of “kaarm down”, “Steevie G!”, or “oor’right mate”. All silly feuding aside, these two North West titans have more in common than they care to admit – cosmopolitan cities filled with passionate inhabitants and a shared spectrum of epic music. There’s no denying the two have great music heritage and I for one don’t mind crossing the boundary to relish in Manchester’s.

A particular favorite is Joy Division, and combining a passion for music and theatre I jumped at the chance to see New Dawn Fades, a play that recounts the days of the band’s ascension to success and their tragic demise. This one off performance corresponds with the 35th anniversary of Ian Curtis’ death and honors him beautifully.

Very much a play of two halves; we are first guided by band manager Tony Wilson as he narrates the story. Played by Lee Joseph, who exudes Wilson’s playful charisma and wit. Joseph uses these qualities to educate the audience on Manchester’s history (an integral part of Joy Division’s beginnings) thus lighting the fires of passion in the belly of all watching, be they devote Division fans, theatre fans or newbies.

Playing roles of non-fiction always carries the risk of playing a caricature rather than more rounded portrayals of their characters, but Joseph plays the Mancunian legend to perfection. In fact, the casting is excellent across the board, with Bernard Sumner played by Sean Croke, Stephen Morris by Matthew Melbourne and Peter Hook by Bill Bradshaw.

Completing the band line up is Ian Curtis played by Michael Whittaker, whose performance is eerily astounding. Rising to the challenge of playing the role of an adored music icon, he made it look effortless as if Curtis is living on through this performance. Whittaker encaptures his spirit, crafing a complex portrait of Curtis’s fragility and his struggle with epilepsy, all while being torn between his duty to those around him and his own worries over his morality.

Another emotive driver in the piece comes from Natalie Perry playing Debbie Curtis. Her being the only female in the play accentuated the idea of isolation, as she desperately tries to remain supportive of her husband’s dreams while tensions build between them and bleakness encroaches on Ian.

Written by Brian Gorman the play is intelligent and well thought out, and director Sarah Van Parys finds a balance between accuracy and sensitivity to create this stunning and emotive piece.

Words: Kate Morris

Image: Courtesy of All Roads Meet

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